Consensus Resolutions Criteria

To be placed on a docket for consideration by NLGA Members at a meeting, a proposed Consensus Resolution must meet the following criteria through review by the NLGA Director and/or Deputy Director:

  • Single issue: Consensus Resolutions should provide an overview of one issue area, program, or topic, and this is interpreted in a strict sense.  Resolutions should not be overly broad, complex, or require additional research. Resolutions should be understood on their face and not require accompanying explanations or documentation.
  • Non-controversial: The topic of the Resolution is an existing area of consensus and is unlikely to encounter immediate opposition as a topic of consideration.
  • Nonpartisan: The topic of the Resolution is not partisan or polarizing in nature.
  • Resolution cannot have a fiscal impact to state/territorial government, or said impact must be nominal.
  • Resolution cannot call for action at the federal or Congressional level, or otherwise call for NLGA to advocate on specific legislation or action at the federal level. NLGA is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit and does not engage in advocacy activities. Consensus Resolutions should focus on state/territorial government issues and areas of activity.
  • Includes verifiable, credible, factual citations of all statistics, data, and claims. 
  • Submitted to NLGA staff by the deadline designated by NLGA, typically approx. 45 days before the start of the meeting. The final agenda of Consensus Resolutions will be posted on the NLGA website no later than 30 days before the start of the meeting.

Examples of Consensus Resolutions:

  • Educational: Resolutions that provide an overview of a specific topic or issue intended to provide factual information to state/territorial government leaders.
  • Recognition/Awareness: Resolutions that declare a day, week, or month in recognition of a specific, non-controversial topic.
  • Action Items for States/Territories: Resolutions that share programs, innovations, or solutions successfully implemented by government that NLGA Members may choose to pursue in their states/territories. These programs should be non-controversial, proven to have nominal fiscal impact, and shall not call for a position, action or advocacy at the federal, Congressional, or international level.